Tag Archives: Misha Gregory Macaw

Like the Germans Do

Death Figure.  Ulmer Muenster, Ulm, Germany, 2018.

Death Figure
Ulmer Muenster, Ulm, Germany, 2018

I came across this cheery fellow in a small alcove of the Ulmer Muenster, a gothic church in Ulm, Germany.  Nobody does gothic like the Germans do.

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment

Meeting the Challenge

Bright Cloud Over Longs Peak

Bright Cloud Over Longs Peak
Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, 2017

I never get tired of the views of Longs Peak from the Trail Ridge Road area of Rocky Mountain National Park.  I have a number of images collected together on this website of the peak photographed from this area, and probably a dozen (or more) pretty much finished images of it that I haven’t gotten around to posting yet.

After a few years of doing these kinds of photographs, I began to realize that many of the images I was making were looking alike.  The profile of the peak is more or less the same, and the big topographic features of the terrain remain the same too.  Given these limitations, the challenge of the project has become to see if I can keep making photographs of the peak in such a way that each given image says something unique about it and the collection as a whole does not become duplicative or boring.

This image was taken well after the sun went down over the horizon (I’m always surprised at how many landscape photographers pack it up after the sun goes down – some of the best light remains for a good 20 or more minutes after sunset!).  As I recall, the sky conditions were pretty flat and I wasn’t sure if I could make something interesting out of the scene.  There was a bright spot on the clouds above the peak, though, that with the longer exposures required in the dim light produced the interesting elongation of the cloud that shows up in this image.  In the end, I think it fits the criteria I set for myself in keeping this series of images going.

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment

I Make the Photographs I Want to See

Baroque Figures, Study No. 2. Asamkirche, Munich, Germany.

Baroque Figures, Study No. 2
Asamkirche, Munich, Germany, 2017

There’s a lot of photography being done out there these days, and a lot of reasons being given for making photographs.  In the art community, in particular, it often seems to me that a photograph is not seen to be complete without a small treatise of theory and explanation to accompany it.

Introspection in an artist is a good thing.  I like to think about the reasons I do what I do, and certainly I encourage anyone engaged in an artistic discipline to do the same.  But it can be taken too far, I think.  Getting too wrapped up in the theory and explanation of photography takes away from its practice.  It can get in the way of producing work or, even worse, compromise the purity of the work being done.

There are many reasons I practice photography, but only one that underlies them all – I strive to make the photographs that I want to see.  I think this both helps to keep me grounded in my approach to photography and keeps me true to my own internal vision in my practice of it.

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment

The Photograph, and Me

White Trees, Series 3, No. 4

White Trees, Series 3, No. 4

In my last post, I mentioned how I feel that when you put a person in a photograph, the photograph tends to become about that person and not whatever else may be in the frame.  For this reason, I tend to avoid putting people in my photographs.

But there’s even a little more to it than that.  I can speak only for myself, but I feel like when I see a person in a photograph, it tends to take me out of the photograph.  To me, a photograph without people in it has two participants – the subject of the photograph, and me, the viewer.  When a photograph has a person in it, it feels to me like the number of participants has grown to three – the subject, the viewer, and the person in the photograph.  Human likenesses exert such a powerful influence, that the depiction of a person in a photograph is almost like having another actual person in on the viewing experience.

I find this inhibiting.  When another person is around, maybe subconsciously I put my guard up.  Even if that person is just a likeness in a photograph.  I feel much more free to really “inhabit” the photograph as my own experience when there are no people depicted in it.

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , Leave a comment

More Human Than Human

Figures Made of Stone, Study No. 1 Colorado Springs, Colorado, 2018

Figures Made of Stone, Study No. 1
Colorado Springs, Colorado, 2018

I’m not a portrait photographer, and in general I don’t like putting people in my images in any capacity.  To me, when you put a person in a photograph, you instantly make the photograph about that person.  If it’s a portrait, then obviously the photograph is about the person whose portrait has been taken.  But even if it’s not a portrait – say, news photography, street photography, or even just a person in a landscape (as sometimes is done to create a sense of scale) – the photograph, to me, still is about that person and his or her relationship to whatever else is going on in the photograph.  By leaving people out of my photographs, I think the photographs are free to be more purely about what my subjects are, typically landscapes, abstracts, or architecture.

Nevertheless, the human condition, as expressed through the human figure, is a fascinating subject in its own right.  The obvious way to explore this subject would be to photograph, well, people.  But again, to me photographing actual people as a way of exploring the human condition runs into the problem I’ve described above.  The photographs are less about the human condition generally, and more about those specific people in the photograph.

What to do?  Personally, I’ve come to enjoy photographing representations of the human figure that are (of course) not actually people.  Using inanimate objects of human likenesses, such as statues, allows the photographs to become figure studies of the human form, without creating the distraction that comes with photographing actual people.  It’s been a wonderful way to explore the expressiveness of figure studies, while maintaining a level of abstraction that you just don’t have when you put a real person into the image.

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , , Leave a comment

Nebulous Residue

White Trees, Series 3, No.3

White Trees, Series 3, No.3

An artist cannot endure reality; he turns away or back from it: his earnest opinion is that the worth of a thing consists in that nebulous residue of it which one derives from colour, form, sound, and thought; he believes that the more subtle, attenuated, and volatile, a thing or a man becomes, the more valuable he becomes: the less real, the greater the worth.

- Friedrich Nietzsche

I wish I could say I can take credit for this quote because I came across it in context, but the truth is I came across it on the Facebook Page this morning of one of my favorite photographers, Guy Tal.  If you like thinking deep thoughts about photography, I highly recommend his blog.

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment

On Portraiture

Marin's Figures, Study No. 2

Marin’s Figures, Study No. 2
Denver, Colorado, 2017

“All photographs are self-portraits.”

- Minor White

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment

Just With a Camera

White Trees, Series 2, No. 8

White Trees, Series 2, No. 8

You don’t make a photograph just with a camera. You bring to the act of photography all the pictures you have seen, the books you have read, the music you have heard, the people you have loved.”

- Ansel Adams

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , Leave a comment

Everything in its Time

Triptych, Radiance No. 1

Triptych, Radiance No. 1

I remember the first black and white photograph I ever made, the one that really got me into photography in a serious way back in 2012, was an abstract triptych I made using an iPhone camera as the capture device.  For awhile, back then, I was really into these triptychs.  I made quite a few, and then, one day, nothing.  Completely lost my interest in them.  I still thought they were pretty cool, and tried from time to time to rekindle the magic, but I found I couldn’t make one worth anything even if I tried.  The interest and inspiration just wasn’t there.  Years went by.

And now, suddenly, they’re back.  Again, using an iPhone as the camera.  The interest and inspiration is there again.  I’m not sure what changed, nor how long they will be with me, but I’m happy they’re back.  Everything in its time, I guess.

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , , Leave a comment

When We Look at Our Photographs

Baroque Figures, Study No. 1 Asamkirche, Munich, Germany, 2017

Baroque Figures, Study No. 1
Asamkirche, Munich, Germany, 2017

When we look at our photographs and find not the slightest reflection of ourselves, it’s a good sign that our images have lost their souls.

- David duChemin

For the record, I’ve always considered my photographs to be highly reflective of myself.  For better or for worse, I can’t imagine undertaking photography (or any kind of art) in any other way.

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment