Monthly Archives: April 2016

Still, It’s Good to Be in Colorado

Bent Tree, Distant Ranges Near Fraser, Colorado, 2016

Bent Tree, Distant Ranges
Near Fraser, Colorado, 2016

Northern Colorado, where I live, is a great match for me photographically.  If I want to photograph architecture or urban environments, there’s Denver and the cities along the Front Range.  If I want to photograph rural and pastoral scenes, there’s lots of farming and agriculture on the Eastern Plains.  To the north, up towards Wyoming, are the wide open spaces and big sky country of the high plains.  We have cold winters that offer up beautiful snowscapes and warm summers that bring dramatic monsoon storms.  A day’s drive can put me in the spare landscapes of northern New Mexico or the red rock canyons of southern Utah.  Oh yes, and there happens to be a dramatic range of rocky mountains just to the west of where I live here in Fort Collins.

I get out and photograph a fair amount, and I’m very aware that I’m fortunate to have so many opportunities for photography around me.  Even if I didn’t live here, though, I’m confident that I would still photograph just as much.  I’ve always believed there’s good opportunities for photography anywhere, not just in “marquee” locations like here in Colorado.  I think those who feel they have to travel to special or exotic locations to photograph are missing the just-as-good options for photographs closer to home and fooling themselves into thinking that locations make a difference in making good images.  It’s not the subject matter that makes good photographs, it’s the photographer.  The drive to be creative and express that creativity through photographic images comes from inside, and I believe I would be producing just as much work at the same level I am now whether I were to live here in Colorado, or in Dover, Delaware, or Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, or Bakersfield, California.

Still, the foregoing notwithstanding, I have to admit I got lucky that my environment matches my photographic interests so closely.  It’s good to be in Colorado.

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It’s Okay to be Quiet

Fence in a Snowy Landscape Near Carr, Colorado, 2016

Fence in a Snowy Landscape
Near Carr, Colorado, 2016

If you work on photographs using image editing software, maybe you’ve heard that you should set a true white point and a true black point.  In Photoshop, this would be accomplished, for example, by using the Levels tool to move the black point slider to where it just about touches the left side of the histogram and the white point slider to where it just about touches the right side of the histogram.  The idea is that having a true black and a true white ensures that the full range of tones from black to white will be present in the image, and that images without the full range of tones will tend to look flat and lifeless.

Well, it’s a good idea and most of my images in fact do have a true black point and a true white point.  But not this one.  From memory, I believe the blackest point is about RGB = 15, 15, 15 and the whitest point is about RGB = 240, 240, 240.  Given that the RGB range for a black and white image is from 0, 0, 0 to 256, 256, 256, this means there’s a non-trivial gap at each end of the image’s histogram, and instead of having the full range of tones from black to white, the image tones here are somewhat compressed into a band from dark grey to light grey.

But I like it this way.  If I had used a true black and a true white, the image would have been more crisp, vibrant, and dynamic.  It also would have been louder, punchier, and more in-your-face.  That’s not what this scene is about.  It’s about the peacefulness and calmness that was present in the (very cold) air that day and what I was feeling about it when I tripped the shutter.

I think the more compressed tonal range is an effective tool with which to communicate that calm and quiet feeling.  I also should note that I think you can get away without using a true black and a true white in this image because it is an image of snow – the presence of so many white tones means you can still get sufficient contrast between the snow and the fence to keep interest, even without having the full range of tones present.

Perhaps more importantly, I think it’s okay for the image to be calm and quiet.  Computers and software make it so easy to pump up the contrast and (for color images) saturation that a good number of photographs these days tend to make me feel like I’m being shouted at.

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Self Reflection

White Trees, Series 2, No. 6

White Trees, Series 2, No. 6

The image in this post is my most recent addition to my White Trees series. The White Trees series is an interesting one to me, because it represents my longest sustained effort on a single photographic subject.  The first images in this series were among the first black and white images I ever made.

Since then, I feel I’ve done a lot of growing as photographer.  I’ve learned new things about fieldwork and image editing, I’ve explored a variety of landscapes and other types of subjects, and I’ve learned about the different approaches and philosophies taken by other photographers and artists practicing their disciplines.  During this time, I’ve continued to photograph these trees in a steady and sustained way, simply because they continue to hold my interest.

As I’ve changed as a photographer, I wonder if those changes are noticeable in this series?  To me, the series as a whole still has a cohesive look and feel, so I’m pleased that I’m still able to tap into the concept that holds it all together.  When I look closely, though, I do think I see the evidence of how I’ve been changing as a photographer.  I definitely feel I’m not the same photographer (person?) now that I was then, and it’s been interesting and instructive to reflect on that.

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