Monthly Archives: March 2016

A Sense of Place

On the Low Road to Taos Near Taos, New Mexico, 2015

On the Low Road to Taos
Near Taos, New Mexico, 2015

How closely should a photograph reference the place at which it was taken?

I think back before I got into the practice of photography, and simply was a consumer of photographs, I tended to favor photographs of landscapes that I had personally been to.  I think I’ve always been an observer of the landscape, and on that basis photographs of landscapes that I had personally experienced were more meaningful to me.

When I began making photographs of my own, I think my perception of photographs changed.  I’ve tended to favor photographs of anonymous locations, where one can’t tell simply by viewing the photograph where it was taken.  Perhaps I’ve felt the emphasis should more properly be on the content of the photograph itself, divorced from any associations one might make from knowing the location.

But I wonder if that view really holds up.  When I went to title this image, I could have used a title non-specific as to location, such as “Tree and Mailbox” or “Reaching Tree, Curving Cloud.”  But somehow I felt that the title, and therefore the image, should reference its place at the side of a bend on the Low Road to Taos, New Mexico.

Maybe it’s better not to overthink these things, and just go with your instinct.

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Daylight Savings

Tree Split Mount Goliath, Colorado, 2015

Tree Split
Mount Goliath, Colorado, 2015

About a week ago it was daylight saving time here in the U.S., which means that clocks were pushed forward by one hour.  I’d been looking forward to this for some time, because the additional hour of daylight in the evenings means that there now is enough time to do whatever it is I may be doing during the day, and still have enough light for some photography in the evening.

For example, this past weekend I spent the day both Saturday and Sunday skiing, but after the ski day was over there still was enough daylight to do some exploring and photographing in the snowy mountains near the ski area.  As the days get even longer, I’m looking forward to getting out in the evenings after my day job to photograph in and along the Front Range near my home here in Fort Collins, Colorado.  By June and July, there will be enough light for me to make the hour or so drive up to Rocky Mountain National Park and still have an hour or two to explore and photograph before it gets dark.

It’s fun for me to get out with my camera, but there’s a bigger point at issue here.  It’s the idea of working photography into my daily routine.  As I’ve mentioned before, I have a full-time day job as well as all of the chores and responsibilities of daily living.  Often, at the end of the day, I’m tired and it would be easy just to wind things down and call it quits.

But I think photography is kind of a “do it or lose it” discipline.  Staying engaged with it on a daily basis – be it making captures in the field, editing captured work, or simply reading and learning new things – is necessary to keep developing one’s art and craft.  I think it’s important, therefore, to find ways to work it into the daily routine.  Fortunately, for me anyway, it’s not hard to do because the desire is there.  It’s simply a matter of making it a priority and following through with it.

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An Open Question

Three Bins, Old Snow Weld County, Colorado, 2016

Three Bins, Old Snow
Weld County, Colorado, 2016

I have a theory that if you have an artistic vision and you follow it honestly, then your work will always look like yours and not that of someone else.  I think this is true because one’s vision directly follows from who one is, and we are all unique individuals with our own unique ways of seeing the world.  For this reason, it doesn’t matter what we photograph because, assuming we stay true to our visions, our photographs can’t help but look like they’re ours, no matter what the subject is.

Well, I think I’m really putting that to the test with this image.  Grain bins are a very popular subject among photographers, and have been photographed in countless manners and iterations.  Is there really something in this image that is uniquely mine?  Does it really have some attribute or characteristic that reveals the evidence of my own hand?

Perhaps you’re expecting an answer from me to my own question.  It’s true that I often set up questions and answers, but here I really don’t have one.  I do like the image, though, so it just will have to remain an open question.

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Absence Makes the Heart Grow Fonder

Moon Over Sprague Lake Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, 2015

Moon Over Sprague Lake
Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, 2015

Here is an image that was captured last summer in Rocky Mountain National Park and probably edited not too long thereafter.  It sat unnoticed on my hard drive until just a couple of weeks ago, when I came across it by accident while going through my files looking for something else.

I’m not sure why I didn’t think it was post-worthy the first time around.  Maybe I didn’t like the way the long exposure blurred the shape of the moon, or the fact that the clouds actually are airplane contrails windblown into the shapes of streamers, or that there are two fisherman visible in the image (normally I don’t include people in my images).

If those things bothered me before, they don’t now.  In fact, I rather like them.  They say absence makes the heart grow fonder, what is it about time spent away from something that makes it more appealing?

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